Step by Step

RoofIt’s very tempting to get stuck straight into work on site after taking on an old building but I am taking time to understand my property’s history and construction first. My house has survived for 500 years remarkably unscathed and I’m acutely aware that by acting in haste I could inadvertently cause serious damage in literally just a few minutes.

The more you know about an old building, the more successful a project is likely to be. For example, a good understanding of my house’s history will, I hope, help me to make sensible changes that respect its historic fabric. And an appreciation of the way it is built should assist me in seeing why any deterioration has set in and how it might successfully be put right.

I must emphasise that the knowledge I gain about my house won’t be used to restore it back to some former point in time, which would be anathema to the principles of the SPAB and could create an unsatisfactory fake. I’ll also use non-destructive survey techniques in addition to documentary research to avoid harming the building.

Essential maintenance will, of course, still be required pending the start of major work. One of my immediate jobs has been to reinstate the odd slipped slate on the Victorian extension (pictured) to keep out the rain.

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