Enduring Local Interest

I hosted a visit the other day for about a dozen local people representing the Recorders of Uttlesford History (www.recordinguttlesfordhistory.org.uk). The group was set up to record the present and ensure that valuable artefacts and archives of the past are conserved. The Recorders wished to see my property in its current unrenovated condition and plan to return again later.

Over the years, there’s been much local interest in the range of buildings that includes my cottages. When purchasing them, I discovered that local donations and a wider appeal helped the Ancient Buildings Trust (ABT) acquire the range in the 1930s to protect it from possible harm. The ABT was the property-holding arm of the SPAB, who, coincidentally, I work for!

To secure the donors’ gift should the ABT sell its interest, it took a long lease and vested the freehold in the National Trust. The ABT sold its lease in the 1960s after overhauling the greater part of the range. However, it hadn’t been able to gain vacant possession of what are now my two cottages to modernise these. They’ve changed little since, so in many ways I’m picking up where the ABT left off over 40 years ago.

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Monitoring Temperature and Humidity

Every month I’m downloading onto my computer readings from half a dozen data loggers that I have distributed around the property – five inside and one outside. The idea is to identify any locations where the fabric might be at risk of deterioration due to condensation, as well as to obtain a clearer picture of how the building is performing in order to help guide me with the changes I make to the levels of thermal insulation and ventilation as part of my renovation project.

I purchased the loggers online from http://www.tomsgadgets.com (Lascar EL-USB-2). They record air temperature, humidity and dew point (the temperature at which water vapour in the atmosphere begins to condense). The devices, which are battery-operated, are currently set to sample at hourly intervals. The data stored is downloaded by plugging the logger straight into a computer’s USB port and running the purpose-designed software that comes with it. The data can then be graphed, printed or exported to other applications.

The monitoring has already enabled me to establish that I need to improve the conditions in one of my roof spaces to reduce the likelihood of condensation and associated timber decay.

A Lick of Limewash

The SPAB frequently cautions homeowners who have just purchased an old house to wait until they’ve become familiar with it over a number of seasons before proceeding with major work because their ideas often change. The advice is to concentrate your efforts instead on the garden first. I don’t have a large garden so have been developing thoughts about my forthcoming building project whilst re-limewashing the external timbers.

In my view, it’s best to limewash rather than blacken the timbers of an old building such as mine since the black-and-white ‘magpie’ effect only became fashionable in the eastern counties during the Victorian period. It appears that the dark coatings on my timberwork were stripped in the 1970s.

Limewash is a simple type of matt paint comprising lime and water (sometimes with additives, such as pigments). It’s inexpensive and easy to make from lime putty (01652 686000; http://www.singletonbirch.co.uk). I’ve included a little casein power from Ty-Mawr Lime Ltd (01874 611350; http://www.lime.org.uk) for better adhesion on the smoother joinery. Limewash needs building up in several thin coats. Luckily, I’ve been assisted a friend and the three young construction professionals, or Scholars (pictured), currently undertaking the SPAB’s training programme in practical building conservation.

Problems with Pigeons

Bird on roofThe two giant plasterwork figures on one of my gables have been sporting new hairdos lately, thanks to the messy deposits from pigeons that have taken to roosting beneath the barge boards. We’ve therefore resorted to blocking the points where the birds were perching with compressed wire mesh. If this works – and so far it seems to have done the trick, touch wood – we’ll use the same technique for the other gable.

PargetingMy neighbours, the Reeds, kindly loaned us their ladder but due to the fragility of the decorative plasterwork (pargeting) I’m going to play safe in the future and use a mobile tower scaffold. As the front of the house abuts the pavement, though, I can only erect this outside normal working hours if I’m to avoid obtaining a scaffolding licence from the county council. I’m now looking into buying my own scaffolding, which will also be useful when I redecorate.

Guided Tours

Street view Saffron WaldenThirty members of the Stansted Mountfitchet Local History Society descended on my house the other day.

Once again, I’ve leapt at the chance to be a tour guide, having already hosted visits by several SPAB parties.

It’s a good time for people to see the property whilst it is still in a fairly untouched state and I believe that the visits will help increase the awareness of old buildings and the heritage of the town generally. The more that people appreciate the historic environment, the more likely they are to care about it.

There’s much concern locally at the moment about the need to protect the area and its unique character from over-development.

My visPeople in Saffron Waldenitors from Stansted were particularly anxious about the possibility of a second runway at the nearby airport, which is opposed by 89% of people in the district and would involve the callous destruction of at least 35 historic buildings.

(www.stopstanstedexpansion.com).

As elsewhere, there’s also unease about the impact of hundreds of centrally-imposed new houses and more out-of-town supermarket provision. A campaign has recently been launched to save Saffron Walden Town Centre (www.savewaldentowncentre.org).